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Teacher resources

Subscriber Special: April

April 24th-30th:

Coaching or Mentoring

BOGO — Buy one month; get the second free

Do any of these sound like you?

  • Your kindergartners don’t know what ‘enter’, ‘spacebar’, ‘click’ or many other techie words mean but you need to teach them to keyboard, internet, and become digital citizens. How do you start?
  • You have new students in your class who haven’t had technology training. The rest of the class has. How do you catch them up?
  • Your principal wants you to teach the technology class but you’ve never done it before. What do you do on the first day?
  • You’ve been teaching for twenty years but now your Principal wants technology integrated into your class. Where do you start?
  • You have a wide mix of tech skills among students in your class. How do you differentiate between student geeks and students who wonder what the right mouse button is for?
  • You’ve been tasked with organizing a Technology Use Plan for your school. Where do you start?
  • You and colleagues are expected to create a Curriculum Map. How does technology fit into that?
  • You love being an edtech professional but what’s your career path?

More and more teachers–both new and experienced–are looking for coaching or mentoring to fill gaps in their learning, keep up to date on the latest teaching strategies, and solve problems they didn’t expect. Many turn to the personalized approach we offer in a collaboration between Ask a Tech Teacher, Jacqui Murray, and Structured Learning. Coaching is completed via Google Hangout with email available for quick questions. After only a short time, teachers find they are better prepared with tech-infused lesson plans, able to teach to standards more fluently, can integrate tech into core classroom time, easily differentiate for student needs with tech, and more.

“Once a month, pick my brain. I’ll share what I’ve learned and what works from 25 years of teaching.” –Jacqui Murray

Normally, we charge a $150 per month with a two month minimum (for a total of $300). This month between the 24th and 30th, get both months of coaching or mentoring for only $150.

Click our PayPal Me here. Add $150.00 to the line.

ask a tech teacher

Because it’s PayPal, you can enter as a guest with any credit card–no PayPal account required.

We wrote the books. We’ll help you deliver on keyboarding, integrating tech into your curriculum, digital citizenship, Common Core, and more. Questions? Ask Jacqui Murray at askatechteacher at gmail dot com.

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Categories: Freebies/Discounts, Subscriber special, Teacher resources | Leave a comment

What You Might Have Missed in March

Here are the most-read posts for the month of March:

  1. 14 Education Advancements in a Year
  2. Why Flipped and Blended Learning are Making Waves in education
  3. 6 Worthwhile Websites for High School Classes
  4. Tech That Won’t Survive 2018
  5. The Wild and Amazing World of Augmented Reality
  6. How to Build Lifelong Learners
  7. Update a Classic Bridge Building Lesson Plan
  8. How to Prepare for the SAT
  9. International Blog Delurking Week–Get Involved!

Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-18 technology for 25 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice reviewer, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning. Read Jacqui’s tech thrillers, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days.

Categories: Teacher resources | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Ways to use a movie for language teaching

Today, we have a guest post from Philip Perry, founder of Learnclick.com, an online quiz tool lots of teachers use to create and share quizzes. It is also ideal for teaching language as it has many options for asking questions in context. Here, Philip addresses the use of movies in teaching:

Movies are a great way for learning a language as it helps getting used to the real-life usage. If you are teaching English or any other language you should consider occasionally having your class watch a movie. In this article, we will explore some ways to get the most out of it.

Before you watch a movie together, take some time to introduce it to the class. Start by watching the opening scene and then stop the movie and discuss who the main characters are and summarize the plot.

The following ideas are things you can either do while watching the movie or after having watched the whole movie.

Dialogue: Asking questions about movies is an excellent way to get your students talking. Even the shy ones will be more likely to open up. For example, stop the movie and ask them to predict what will happen next.

moviesheets.com has a database with worksheets for a lot of movies. It can help you with coming up with questions. For example, if you are watching “Oliver Twist” together, you could ask “How were the conditions in the orphanage?”. Or have a more general discussion about what beliefs Dickens was trying to challenge with this story.

Observation: Ask the students to look out for specific items or listen for specific vocabulary words. The first student who sees/hears it, stands up and mentions what he found. As a reward, he gets a candy. Or if you prefer, you can give them a worksheet where they have short phrases and they need to check who said what while they are watching.

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Categories: Teacher resources, Videos | 2 Comments

What You Might Have Missed in February

Here are the most-read posts for the month of February:

  1. 39 Resources for Read Across America Day
  2. What is the VARK model of Student Learning?
  3. Citing Sources: The Infographic
  4.  Innovative Ways to Encourage Writing
  5. Best-in-Category Winners for 2017
  6. Quick Review of 7 Popular Math Programs
  7. Support English Learners with Micro-credentials from Digital Promise
  8. Plagiarism: What it is and how to identify it
  9. Tech Tips #170: Cover your webcam!

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Categories: Teacher resources | Tags: , | 2 Comments

What You Might Have Missed in January

Here are the most-read posts for the month of January:

  1. 10 Options for Polls and Forms in Your Class
  2. Keyboarding 101
  3. What is a Growth Mindset?
  4. Technology and Writing: A Conversation with Vicki Davis
  5. Remote Learning: Tips for Thriving in This Ecosystem
  6. Teacher Support in the Digital-Blended Classroom
  7. Virtual Reality in the Classroom: It’s Easy to Get Started
  8. 2 Martin Luther King Day Lesson Plans and a Book
  9. Best-in-Class Resources–You Decide

Last chance to vote on your favorite webtool based on its category! This will close about January 31st.


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-18 technology for 20 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, CSG Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice reviewer, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning. Read Jacqui’s tech thriller series, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days

Categories: Teacher resources | Tags: , | 3 Comments

10 Options for Polls and Forms in Your Class

Collecting class data, asking for feedback on activities, and pushing out quizzes used to be laboriously accomplished by passing out paper documents, collecting them as they dribbled in, and then collating the data into a spreadsheet where you could sort and shake to come up with the useful information.

These days, all of those tasks are accomplished much more easily with one of the many free/fee webtools designed to create and curate information. Uses include but are not limited to:

  • volunteer sign ups
  • feedback on events
  • class enrollments
  • donations and payments
  • consent forms for school activities
  • polls and surveys on upcoming or past events
  • data on parents and students
  • collection of student projects
  • sign-ups for student class presentations
  • signups for afterschool activities or summer classes
  • registrations for a Professional Development workshop
  • quizzes that are automatically evaluated providing students with their score and you with metrics

Besides the ease of use and their digital nature, students love forms because they are anonymous. This means when forms are used to collect feedback, input, and projects, students can participate at their own pace, as quietly as they’d like, with only the teacher being aware of their identity.

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Categories: Classroom management, Teacher resources, Web Tools | Tags: , , | 5 Comments

10 Hits and 10 Misses for 2017

Since we at Ask a Tech Teacher started this blog six years ago, we’ve had over 5.3 million visitors to the 1,797 articles on integrating technology into the classroom. This includes tech tips, website/app reviews, tech-in-ed pedagogy, how-tos, videos, and more. We have regular features like:

If you’ve just arrived at Ask a Tech Teacher, start here.

It always surprises us what readers find to be the most and least provocative. The latter is as likely to be a post one of us on the crew put heart and soul into, sure we were sharing Very Important Information, as the former. Talk about humility.

Before you look at what statistics say are the most popular posts, tell me what your most popular categories are by voting in this poll:

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Categories: Blogging, Teacher resources | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

What You Might Have Missed in December

Here are the most-read posts for the month of December:

  1. End-of-Year Maintenance: 19 Steps To A Speedier Computer
  2. End-of-year Maintenance: Image and Back-up Digital Devices
  3. End of Year Maintenance: Update Your Online Presence
  4. New Year, New Mindset (my New Year resolutions)

If you’re planning ahead to Martin Luther King Day, here are two lesson plans I have on Teachers Pay Teachers that include research and background on this seminal American. You can get them for free if you check out January’s Subscriber Special (if you’re a subscriber).


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-18 technology for 18 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning. She is also the author of the tech-thriller series, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days.

Categories: Teacher resources | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Best-in-Class Resources–You Decide

top teched toolsEvery year, I review a large number of websites, apps, and resources that help educators blend technology into their classrooms. I get lots of feedback from readers sharing their experiences, asking questions, and clicking through to see if a particular tool will serve their needs.

But, I often don’t hear how the product worked in the fullness of time.

Starting last year, I sought out your opinions:

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Categories: Awards, Reviews, Teacher resources | 2 Comments

End of Year Maintenance: Update Your Online Presence

This week, I’ll share three holiday activities that will get your computers, technology, and social media ready for the new year. Here’s what you’ll get:

  1. Update Your Online Presence
  2. Backup and Image your computer
  3. 19 Ways to Speed Up Your Computer

A note: The links won’t work until the articles publish!

Today: Update Your Online Presence

For most teachers I know, life zooms by, filled with lesson planning, meetings, classes, collaborations with their grade-level team, parent meetings, and thinking. There are few breaks to update/fix/maintain the tech tools that allow us to pursue our trade.

But, that must happen or they deteriorate and no longer accomplish what we need them to do. Cussing them out does no good. Buying new systems takes a long time and doesn’t fix the problem that the old one wasn’t kept up. If they aren’t taken care of, we are left wondering why our teacher blog or website isn’t accomplishing what it does for everyone else, why our social media Tweeple don’t answer us, and why our TPT materials languish. There’s a short list of upkeep items that won’t take long to accomplish. The end of the calendar year is a good time to do these:

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Categories: Blogging, Digital Citizenship, Teacher resources | Tags: , | 5 Comments