Author: Jacqui

Welcome to my virtual classroom. I've been a tech teacher for 15 years, but modern technology offers more to get my ideas across to students than at any time in my career. Drop in to my class wikis, classroom blog, our internet start pages. I'll answer your questions about how to teach tech, what to teach when, where the best virtual sites are. Need more--let's chat about issues of importance in tech ed. Want to see what I'm doing today? Click the gravatar and select the grade.

Tech Tip #182: Easy Speech-to-Text–and Free

Tech Tips for Writers is an occasional post on overcoming Tech Dread among teacher-authors. I’ll cover issues that writer friends, both real-time and virtual, have shared. Feel free to post a comment about a question you have. I’ll cover it in a future tip.

You may have seen this on my education blog

A friend posted about needing suggestions for speech-to-text options for his writing. It reminded me that some people may not know that this tool is now built into both Google Docs and MS Word (for those with Office 365 only). Make sure your microphone is enabled and then here’s how to use them:

MS Word

  • Open a Word doc
  • Go to Home>Dictate

Google Docs

  • Be sure you are in Chrome
  • Open Google Docs (easiest way: type doc.new into your Chrome browser for a new file)
  • Go to Tools>Voice typing

That’s it! Questions? Ask them in the comments

Copyright © 2023 AskaTechTeacher.com – All rights reserved.

Here’s the sign-up link if the image above doesn’t work:

http://eepurl.com/chNlYb


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-18 technology for 30 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-12 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and author of the tech thrillers, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days. You can find her resources at Structured Learning.

Tech Tip #38 My desktop icons changed

tech tipsIn these 169 tech-centric situations, you get an overview of pedagogy—the tech topics most important to your teaching—as well as practical strategies to address most classroom tech situations, how to scaffold these to learning, and where they provide the subtext to daily tech-infused education.

Today’s tip: My desktop icons changed

Category: Problem-solving

Q:  The desktop icons I usually have are gone and some I’ve never seen before are there. What happened?

A:  I get this question a lot:  Push the start button (on your PC) and check the login. It should be your log-in name. Any other, log out and in as yourself.

The difference on a Chromebook shows up on the Shelf; an iPad, on the Home screen. Make sure you’re the active profile.

This happens often when each grade level has a separate log-in. Students being students often forget to log out. I teach even the youngers how to solve this problem. Truth be known, lots of teachers have this problem, also. They’re used to sitting down at a computer shared only with themselves. If the tech geeks do something on it–maybe fix a problem–and forget to log out, my teachers are lost.

Sign up for a new tip each week or buy the entire 169 Real-world Ways to Put Tech into Your Classroom.

What’s your favorite tech tip in your classroom? Share it in the comments below. (more…)

5 Tips to Simplify Tech

Ask a Tech Teacher has a book of 169 tech tips to energize your classroom. We’ve added about ten more since publication. Here are some of the tips educators find most useful. The heading will click through to a more detailed article on the tip:

Tech Tip #167–How to Evaluate Apps

Here are thirteen tips to evaluate the apps you’ll find useful in your classroom:

    1. free or small fee
    2. stand the test of time
    3. positive parent reports
    4. rated ‘for everyone’ or ‘low maturity’
    5. no in-app purchases or billing
    6. support the ‘4 C’s’–creativity, critical thinking, communication, collaboration
    7. offer compelling content (this is subjective: ‘Compelling’ varies teacher-to-teacher and student-to-student)
    8. are not distracting or overwhelming in colors, music, or activity
    9. offer levels that become increasingly more difficult, providing differentiation for student needs
    10. few ads–and those that are there do not take up a significant portion of the screen
    11. intuitive to use with a shallow learning curve that encourages independence
    12. easily applied to a variety of educational environments
    13. doesn’t collect personal information other than user credentials or data required to operate the app

Tech Tip #68: Make Desktop Icons Big or Little

  • Highlight all desktop icons by clicking and dragging a box around them.
  • Push Ctrl and roll the mouse wheel.  It enlarges or delarges them.

Tech Tip #147: 5 Ways to Involve Parents

  1. have an open door policy
  2. create a family-friendly environment
  3. offer parent technology classes
  4. communicate often with parents
  5. solicit help in/out of the classroom

Tech Tip: The Windows Clipboard

Windows has a native clipboard (I see some of you rolling your eyes, like of course you know this. Bear with me) that holds twenty-ish clips. Here’s how you access it:

    • Click the Windows Key and V.
    • That opens the multi-clip clipboard.
    • If you don’t have it activated, the shortkey will ask you to activate it.
    • If the clip is one you want to save–maybe a temp

Note: If you click through to the original article, you’ll have to scroll down a bit because this was posted under ‘What’s Happening on my Writer’s Blog’.

Tech Tip: Get Rid of Spam in Text Messages

The law requires email senders include ‘unsubscribe’ in the email (at least, they do in America–not sure about other countries), but that doesn’t apply to text messages. Here’s a trick that will stop some:

    • Select the text message.
    • Select the sender from the top detail with click-hold (in the case of the video, I click-hold the phone number). It will open the contact card
    • Click ‘Info’
    • One of the options toward the bottom will be ‘Block’. Click that.
    • When you return to the email, it will show it’s blocked.

Note: If you click through to the original article, you’ll have to scroll down a bit because this was posted under ‘What’s Happening on my Writer’s Blog’.

I hope these are helpful. I’ll have more later!

Copyright ©2023 AskaTechTeacher.com – All rights reserved.

Here’s the sign-up link if the image above doesn’t work:

https://eepurl.com/chNlYb


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-18 technology for 30 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-12 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and author of the tech thrillers, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days. You can find her resources at Structured Learning.

Teacher-Authors: What’s Happening on my Writer’s Blog

 

A lot of teacher-authors read my WordDreams blog. In this monthly column, I share a popular post from the past month here, on my teacher education blog. 

National Science Fiction Day is unofficially celebrated by many science fiction fans in the United States on January 2, which corresponds with the official birthdate of famed science fiction writer Isaac Asimov. While not an official holiday of any sort (in the sense that it is not recognized or declared by any government), National Science Fiction Day iss recognized by organizations such as the Hallmark Channel and the Scholastic Corporation. 

Though I don’t write sci fi, I celebrate this event every year so I can share the good news about my favorite Indie (some hybrid) science fiction writers:

Alex Cavanaugh

Craig Boyack

Grace Blair

Jacqui Murray (yes, me! in my early tech thrillers)

Nicholas Rossis

Staci Troilo

Tyrean Martinson

(more…)

4 Tips on Getting into Princeton

Getting into your dream university–especially if it’s Ivy League–is not an easy task. One of our Ask a Tech Teacher contributors has four suggestions to make it easier:

How Hard is it to Get into #Princeton University? 

Located in Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton is a member of the prestigious Ivy League. It is famous for its academic excellence and distinguished faculty. The university is one of the top universities in the United States. Thus, admission is sought after by students from around the world. If you are considering applying to Princeton, it is important to understand the admissions process and what the university is looking for. (more…)

Subscriber Special: free-lesson-plan

January 4th-9th

the 56-page PDF, “25 Digital Tools for the Classroom”

for free!

“25 Digital Tools for the Classroom” is a thorough discussion on which are the most useful tools in a K-8 classroom, organized by grade level. This includes popular digital tools such as blogs, backchannel devices, vocabulary decoding tools, avatars, digital portfolios, digital note-taking, as well as others you may not have thought of. Here’s what you do:

  • Sign up for our newsletter, Weekly Websites, Tech Tips, and Tech Ed News. If you already subscribe, qualify by purchasing one of our resources on the Structured Learning website. Any product, any price qualifies.
  • Email us the welcome message or receipt you receive (we’re at askatechteacher at gmail dot com). Make the subject line read, “Please send free ’25 Digital Tools for the Classroom'”.
  • We’ll send you the collection.
  • If the newsletter doesn’t work for you, there’s an ‘unsubscribe’ at the bottom of each email.

(more…)