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Writing

Can an AI Save the World?

twenty-four daysThis week, my wonderful efriends here in the blogosphere are helping me get the word out about my second novel, Twenty-four Days. What makes this exciting for us geeks and techies–and why I think readers of Ask a Tech Teacher will like it–is that the AI (artificial intelligence) Otto introduced in To Hunt a Sub is all grown up, now a mobile speaking android who plays a critical part in solving the mysteries and saving the world:

A former SEAL, a brilliant scientist, a love-besotted nerd, and a quirky AI have twenty-four days to stop a terrorist attack. The problems: They don’t know what it is, where it is, or who’s involved.

Kirkus Reviews had this to say: had this to say:

A blistering pace is set from the beginning: dates open each new chapter/section, generating a countdown that intensifies the title’s time limit. Murray skillfully bounces from scene to scene, handling numerous characters, from hijackers to MI6 special agent Haster. … A steady tempo and indelible menace form a stirring nautical tale…

I’ll be visiting blogs to chat about the book and answer questions like:

  1. Can science make a warship invisible? 
  2. Exactly how cool is Otto, the AI? 
  3. What is an ‘AI’?
  4. What pick-up line does the story’s geek,  Eitan Sun, use to attract his first wife? 
  5. Are there drones in this book? 
  6. Is the submarine’s invisibility shield like the cloak in Harry Potter? twenty-four days
  7. Do you have to read the prequel, To Hunt a Sub, to understand this book?
  8. How does Otto find submarines anywhere in the world? 
  9. Is this a romantic thriller? 
  10. Is the tech included in the book really possible? 
  11. When is Book 3 in the Rowe-Delamagente series out?

Here’s the schedule of who’ll I’ll visit. I haven’t included the question–you’ll just have to drop in to see the answer:

Date

Blog

Blogger’s Books

5/15/2017 Michael W Smart Amazon page
5/15/2017 Jessica Marie Baumgartner Amazon page
5/16/2017 Stephanie Faris Webpage with books
5/16/2017 D. Wallace Peach Catling’s Bane
5/17/2017 Juneta Key
5/17/2017 Ken Meyer
5/18/2017 Grace Allison Do You Have a Dream?
5/19/2017 Andrew
5/19/2017 M. C. Tuggle
5/19/2017 Jill Weatherholt Second Chance Romance
5/19/2017 Tyrean The Champion Trilogy
5/19/2017 Heather Erickson Facing Cancer as a Friend
5/20/2017 Carolyn Paul Branch Tangled Roots
5/21/2017 Betsy Kerekes 101 Tips for a Happier Marriage
5/21/2017 Robbie Sir Chocolate and the Sugar Dough Bees Story and Cookbook
5/22/2017 Glynis Jolly
5/22/2017 Erika Beebe
5/22/2017 C. Lee McKenzie Double Negative
5/22/2017 Sharon Bonin-Pratt
5/22/2017 Bish Denham Amazon page
5/23/2017 Cathleen Townsend Dragon Hoard and Other Tales of Faerie
5/24/2017 Chemist Ken
5/25/2017 Wendy Unsworth Amazon page
5/25/2017 Rob Akers
5/26/2017 Don Massenzio Amazon page
5/27/2017 Annika Perry
5/28/2017 Jean Davis Sahmara
5/29/2017 Jennifer Kelland Perry Calmer Secrets
5/31/2017 Carol Balawyder Amazon page
6/4/2017 Ronel Janse van Vuuren
6/9/2017 DG Kaye Debbie’s Amazon page
6/16/2017 Laurie Rand

Please join me whenever you can. I’d love to see you.

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Categories: Writing | Tags: , | Leave a comment

An Innovative Way to Use Turnitin’s Revision Assistant

Header imageI’m a fan of Turnitin’s Revision Assistant and have reviewed it in the past. Most schools use it to help students write and revise their essays with automated feedback from the program. Revision Assistant’s feedback is specific and student-driven — given whenever a student calls for a signal check. Comments are written by actual teachers and the RA’s algorithms recognize patterns and guide students as they rewrite their essays.

Newport-Mesa Unified School District, a large district in Southern California, took a slightly different approach: They applied Revision Assistant’s signal check measures to train teachers how to grade essays more consistently across the district’s grading rubric. This clever application of RA made them a finalist in the IMS Global Learning Consortium Learning Impact Awards for creative applications of education technology.

Here’s what they did: A rubric is a matrix that specifically describes the characteristics an essay must have in order to earn a particular numeric score. Usually, it includes about four levels of proficiency and five or six categories. While it may be challenging for teachers to be consistent in grading, an algorithm is 100 percent consistent in scoring because algorithms do not vary from their programming. Newport-Mesa used this consistency to train teachers to better apply the district rubric to writing assignments.

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The district is still in the early stages of training and implementation but other districts may want to learn from their use of data-based instruction. They will present their proposal on May 16 at the Learning Impact Summit.

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169 Tech Tip #124: Editing is Easier with Digital Writing

tech tipsIn these 169 tech-centric situations, you get an overview of pedagogy—the tech topics most important to your teaching—as well as practical strategies to address most classroom tech situations, how to scaffold these to learning, and where they provide the subtext to daily tech-infused education.

Today’s tip: #124–Editing is easier with digital writing

Category: EDIT/FORMAT

Sub-category: Writing, Classroom management

Q: I can’t convince my students to give up their paper and pencil. What’s a great reason that will resonate with them?

A: Digital writing is easier to edit. By a factor of infinity. Anyone who has tried to erase knows they often end up with smudged notes and torn paper. The digital version of editing with a simple overtype or insert is miles ahead. Why force students to use an inferior method?

Sign up for a new tip each week or buy the entire 169 Real-world Ways to Put Tech into Your Classroom.


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 20 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, CSG Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice reviewer, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning. Read Jacqui’s tech thriller series, To Hunt a Sub and Twenty-four Days.

Categories: Classroom management, Tech tips, Writing | Tags: | 4 Comments

5 Resources to Gamify Student Writing

Ask a Tech Teacher guest blogger, Karen Dikson, has put together a collection of online gamified sites that will help your students with their writing: You think the textbooks for today’s generations of students are way more interesting than the once you had? Ask your students. They still think the lessons are boring. If you don’t do anything to make the studying material more appealing, you can’t expect great engagement and results in your classroom.

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Categories: Games/Simulations, Guest post, Writing | 2 Comments

A Pilot Test of Revision Assistant and What We Learned in the Process

Revision Assistant, part of the Turnitin family, is a comprehensive virtual writing assistant for students that allows them to digitally edit and rewrite documents for any class. Last year, Sammy Spencer, a High School English teacher in Southern California, ran a pilot program using Revision Assistant in her school. Here’s her story:

pilot programLast Fall, my El Camino Real High School colleagues and I set out to change the way we teach writing. We wanted to redefine effective standards-based instruction and assessment. By the time we were finished with a pilot test, we discovered that a technology tool helped us and our students in some unexpected ways. It changed our day-to-day writing instruction practices, gave students more power over their own learning, and happily, made writing exercises more real and applicable for other departments like social studies.

In 2016-17, I was the new English department chair at ECRCHS, which is a large public charter school in Los Angeles. We are fortunate in that we have a lot of academic freedom, but since this is an accreditation year, we have to be sure we have data to prove we are meeting our learning objectives.

This year, I needed to help our English department implement shifts in writing methods directed by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). We also needed new pedagogical approaches that would yield data to measure progress. Our literacy coach and English teacher, Heidi Crocker, found a product from Turnitin – Revision Assistant – that used a powerful technology to assess writing and would turn the data it uncovered into feedback that students could apply to their essays immediately. We decided to give it a try.

We took a measured approach and piloted Revision Assistant in August 2016 with a small group of English and History teachers. At around the same time, our administration department asked us to align department objectives so that writing instruction reflected CCSS and the Smarter Balanced-style prompts. We needed benchmark assessments that would not only measure student achievement, but also able to drive instruction.

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Categories: News, Writing | 2 Comments

3 Writing Webtools You Can Learn This Summer in the AATT Summer Learning Series

This summer, Ask a Tech Teacher is holding five Summer Learning classes:

  1. Tech-infused Teacher (Certificate edition for CEUs or grad class for college credit)
  2. Tech-infused Class
  3. Teach Writing with Tech
  4. 20 Webtools in 20 Days (and the Structured Learning curriculum edition)
  5. the Differentiated Teacher

Most award Certificates at completion, for CEUs. The Differentiated Teacher and Tech-infused Teacher can be taken for college credit. The following three tools are part of what you learn in Teach Writing with Tech:

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Categories: Web Tools, Writing | Tags: , | 2 Comments

27 Websites for Poetry Month

poetryApril is National Poetry Month. For thirty days, we celebrate the value and joy that poetry brings to our world.  According to the Academy of American Poets, the goals are:

  • Highlight the extraordinary legacy and ongoing achievement of American poets
  • Introduce more Americans to the pleasures of reading poetry
  • Bring poets and poetry to the public in immediate and innovative ways
  • Make poetry a more important part of the school curriculum
  • Increase the attention paid to poetry by national and local media
  • Encourage increased publication, distribution, and sales of poetry books
  • Increase public and private philanthropic support for poets and poetry

All across the nation, school, teachers, students, libraries, and families celebrate by reading, writing, and sharing poetry. Here are fifteen websites that do all that and more. Share them with students on a class link page like the class internet start page, Symbaloo, or another method you’ve chosen to share groups of websites with students:

Acrostic Poems

From ReadWriteThink–students learn about acrostic poetry and how to write it

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Categories: Writing | Tags: , | 2 Comments

Why and How Students Can Blog

bloggingBlogging is a popular tool used in education to not only practice writing, but reinforce collaboration, perspective taking, speaking/listening skills, and a lot more. It’s grown up from its pedestrian start as a journaling platform, where writers share daily activities and don’t stress over spelling and grammar. Look at these reasons why teachers incorporate blogging across all academic topics and lesson plans:

Collaboration

Students collaborate by commenting on the posts of others and/or co-writing a blog themed to a particular topic, taking turns posting articles.

Developing a profile

Blog profiles–often found at the top of the sidebar–summarize what the blog will address in just a few sentences. They must be pithy, concise, and clear. This is a great way for students to think through the purpose of their blog and share it in a way suited to the task, audience, and purpose. I am constantly reworking my own as I figure out a better way to communicate the gist of what I am doing.

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Categories: Blogging, Writing | 4 Comments

How Google Docs Improves Writing

google docsGoogle Docs is a free word processing program that does 99% of everything a student will ever need to do when writing. What isn’t included as part of the Google Docs program tool can be augmented with mostly free third-party add-ons, extensions, and apps. It operates in the cloud so there’re no download foibles, pesky maintenance, or expensive yearly upgrades. The end result is a learning tool that is powerful, robust, scalable, and because it’s free, is the equitable solution to so many concerns over education’s digital divide.

It’s no surprise that Google Docs and its sister programs — Google Spreadsheets, Google Slideshows, Google Draw, and Google Forms — have taken education by storm, usually in a package like Google Apps for Education (GAFE) or Google Classroom. While it does have a moderate learning curve (no worse than MS Word), once traveled, teachers quickly adopt it as their own and find many reasons why this has become their favorite tool. Here are the top eleven reasons from the educators I talk to:

Always up

I’ve never had the experience of logging into Google Drive (where Google Docs live) and having it not open. On the other hand, I have often experienced that heart-stopping occurrence with MS Word when it suddenly won’t work or a Word file has become corrupted for no reason I can tell. Using Google Docs has probably added years to my life just in the lowered stress levels.

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Categories: Writing | Tags: | 2 Comments

11 Webtools That Make Images Talk

Not only does image annotation combine the best of text and pictures, but kids love it. Adding their own thoughts to a picture or even better, having the picture talk, inspires them to a creative level that’s difficult to achieve with most other communication tools. With the breadth of tech tools available, this is not only easy to accomplish but fits most school budgets.

Here are eleven of my favorite image annotation tools. I think you’ll find many that suit your purposes.

ChatterPix

iOS

Created by Duck Duck Moose, in this popular free app, students take a photo, draw a line on it to make a mouth, and record their voice. Then, the photo ‘talks’ the recording through the mouth. Add a border, decorations, and text, then share with friends as an MP4 video via email or YouTube.

This is a great tool for quick digital stories, academic feedback, or a get-to-know-you activity for the start of school.

[video width="299" height="299" mp4="http://askatechteacher.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/ChatterPix-Video.mp4"][/video]

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Categories: Images, Multimedia, Writing | Tags: | Leave a comment