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How to Talk to a Tech Teacher

Posted by on March 27, 2014

There’s always been something mystical about people in technical professions–engineering, science, mathematics. They talk animatedly about plate tectonics, debate the structure of mathematical functions, even smile at the mention of calculus. The teaching profession has their own version of these individuals, called ‘technology teachers’. They used to be stuffed in a corner of the school where most teachers could pretend they didn’t exist, that what they did was for ‘some other educator in an alternate dimension’.

Thawritert all changed when technology swept across the academic landscape like a firestorm:

  • iPads became the device of choice in the classroom
  • Class SmartScreens became more norm than abnorm(al)
  • Technology in the classroom changed from ‘nice to have’ to ‘must have’
  • 1:1 became a realistic goal
  • Students researched online as often as in the library
  • Students began spending as much time in a digital neighborhood as their home town
  • Textbooks morphed into resources rather than bibles

Today, teachers who don’t use technology are an endangered species. Often, they’re too young to retire, so they get a map from a colleague to that place where they’ve been told they’ll find help–from a person variously called the ‘tech teacher’, ‘integration specialist’, or ‘tech coordinator’.

As they enter the room, Google Maps in hand (an effort to impress), they figure the person they’re looking for must be the one who looks up as they enter, fingers flying across the keyboard, never pausing and never slowing even as she smiles and says, ‘Hi!’.

Before you ask your question, I have a short list of signs that will help you have a more positive experience when you confront this big-brained Sheldon-look-like:

  • You can’t scare them (in fact, even Admin and a lousy economy doesn’t frighten them). They’re techies. Try kindness instead.
  • Patience and tech are oxymorons. Know that going in.
  • Bring food. Techies often forget to eat, or ate everything in their snack stash and need more.
  • Some days, tech looks a lot like work. Distract them with an interesting problem.
  • Start the encounter with a discussion on Dr. Who, Minecraft, or Big Bang Theory. Find a clever tie-in to your topic.
  • Understand that tech teachers often think trying to teach teachers to tech is like solving the Riemann Hypothesis (many consider it impossible). Bone up on basics before the Meeting.
  • Life after the 100th crashed computer is what Oprah might call a life-defining moment. If that just happened as you walked through the door, turn around and come back another time.
  • Understanding a techie who’s in the zone is like understanding the meaning of life. Again–leave the room; come back later.

  • While tech teachers can get your computer working, your Smartscreen humming, and your students all online at once, there are days they need a dictionary to understand everyday English. Be gentle.
  • Know the difference between the happy-techie face and the ‘go away’ face. Act accordingly.
  • Their heads are like Matrix on steroids. Don’t try to understand them–unless, of course, you’re a geek too. Then, you’ll feel at home.
  • Despite past experience with teachers solving their own tech problems, their minds remain open to a miracle. Do try to fix your broken computer yourself (i.e., check for unplugged parts) before calling.

I must confess, I took all of these from personal experience (and some input from geekie friends). Your experiences may be different. I’d love to hear them.

More humor-and-writing posts:

Humor that Inspires–for Teachers! Part I

New Tech Teacher? I Understand You

You Know You’re a Geek When…

15 Ways to Get Your Geek On


Jacqui Murray has been teaching K-8 technology for 15 years. She is the editor/author of over a hundred tech ed resources including a K-8 technology curriculum, K-8 keyboard curriculum, K-8 Digital Citizenship curriculum. She is an adjunct professor in tech ed, CSG Master Teacher, webmaster for four blogs, an Amazon Vine Voice book reviewer, Editorial Review Board member for Journal for Computing Teachers, CAEP reviewer, CSTA presentation reviewer, freelance journalist on tech ed topics, and a weekly contributor to TeachHUB. You can find her resources at Structured Learning.

updated 5-1-16

2 Responses to How to Talk to a Tech Teacher

  1. Mary

    I know this topic doesn’t fit here and I apologize. Do you have any experience with Puffin Academy and its use on iPads? I’ve Googled it and placed the app on my iPad but I am struggling with how it works as a means to allow websites that require Flash. Thanks!

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